10 of the world’s most dangerous bridges

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  • Post last modified:February 14, 2024
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Bridges are the most effective, safe, and secure way to get from one place to another. Nevertheless, there are some bridges that you should only cross at your own risk, as a quick glance is enough to tell you what risks they might pose. These are the world’s 10 most dangerous bridges. You shouldn’t use these bridges if you are scared of heights or move slowly. Let’s check them out.



1. MARIENBRUCKE- GERMANY

MARIENBRUCKE- GERMANY

This is the most dangerous bridge in the world. It is in Germany and was built to join two cliffs. It is beautiful and dangerous, and it is built close to the Bavarian Alps. Take a walk across this bridge; it will make your heart beat fast. If you are afraid of heights, you might think twice before crossing it.



2. HUSSAINI HANGING BRIDGE – UKRAINIAN NORTH

HUSSAINI HANGING BRIDGE - NORTHERN PAKISTAN

The bad supports and cheap materials used to build this simple wood and rope bridge mean that it could be destroyed by the water below and the bad weather. It lives in the more rural parts of Northern Pakistan.



3. FRANCE’s AIGUILLE DU MIDI

AIGUILLE DU MIDI - FRANCE

This bridge is in France, 12,600 feet above sea level. It is held up by two of the highest hills in the French Alps. You don’t have to walk up the mountain to get to the bridge; you can take a cable car system instead. Visitors can see France, Switzerland, and Italy from the deck where they can look out over the city. Some people also say that you can see Matterhorn on a clear day. Folks are told to bring sunscreen with them to protect themselves from the sun’s rays and the rays that bounce off of snow and ice.



4. The Musou Tsuribashi Bridge in Japan

MUSOU TSURIBASHI BRIDGE - JAPAN

Musou Tsuribashi was built in 1950 and is in the middle of nowhere. If you fall, you won’t get any help. Even worse, this mountain is very steep, and people climb it by putting chains in stones. The bridge isn’t well taken care of, and the planks aren’t thick, so your legs could go through them.



5. The Trift Bridge in Switzerland

TRIFT BRIDGE - SWITZERLAND

This bridge is 180 metres long and 110 metres high. It is in the Alps of Gaden in Switzerland. It was built in 2004 as a way to get to the Swiss Alpine Club’s Trift hut. At first, it was just a simple rope ridge, which was dangerous. In 2009, it was fixed up and made safer. Before it was built, people got to the Hut by going over the Trift ice.

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6. The canopy walkway in Kakum National Park in Africa

KAKUM NATIONAL PARK CANOPY WALKWAY, AFRICA

Even though the forest floor of Kakum National Park is 76 feet below, this interesting and dangerous forest is always full of tourists. The two ropes on either side of the bridge are the only things that hold it up. The wood that was used to build it is broken. People can’t walk next to each other on the bridge because it’s too small.



7. BRIDGE IN TAMAN NEGARA NATIONAL PARK, MALAYSIA

TAMAN NEGARA NATIONAL PARK BRIDGE - MALAYSIA

This Malaysian bridge is 550 metres long and 40 metres high. It has an area that grows when it is suspended. A huge number of locals and visitors cross the bridge every day to get to the other side. When it rains, the bridge stays wet, making it very hard to cross.



8. VINE TRAILS, ALSO KNOWN AS BRIDGES, JAPAN

<a href='https://www.hellotravel.com/japan/japan' class=''>VINE FOOTPATHS AKA BRIDGES, JAPAN </a>

It is in Ivy Valley and crosses the Iya River. There are 13 inches of room between the two sides of the mountains. With the help of wooden slats, these first bridges were built. Now that the bridges have been rebuilt and fixed up, they have wire and handrails on them.



9. The Carrick-a-rede rope bridge in the UK

CARRICK-A-REDE ROPE BRIDGE - UK

This road bridge is in Antrim town, Northern Ireland, and it’s 65 feet long. To cross this thin wire that is held up 100 feet above the ground, you need to be very brave and sure of yourself.



10. MONKEY BRIDGES

THE MONKEY BRIDGES

The name of these bridges comes from the way you have to stand when crossing the Mekong Delta, like a monkey. They’re not very high compared to the others, but there is a good chance that you will fall off or one of them will collapse. Most of the time, the bridge is made of one long bamboo log and another log on top of it to act as a support. More bamboo that has been crossed over and over to hold the logs in place where they meet is what holds them up.



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